Tools

Transmogrifier OLE Automation Documentation

This is the documentation for the OLE Automation Interface to Transmogrifier (version 2.1.2 and greater).

Transmogrifier's OLE Automation interface enables it to be used "behind the scenes" by scripts, web servers and other programs like RugOMatic, to create and modify Sims objects. It can also export previews of Sims objects. This OLE Automation interface makes it possible to develop other tools and web services that use Transmogrifier, with scripting languages like JavaScript and Python.

Make Personalized Halloween Tombstones for The Sims

You can to make your own free personalized Halloween Tombstone for The Sims! You can engrave your own personalized tombstones, download them, and email them to your friends! Please visiting the cemetery and pay respects to more than 1200 other peoples' and Sim's memories.

Dumbold Voting Machine for The Sims

The Dumbold Voting Machine for The Sims enables the simulated people in your virtual dollhouse to vote! It's an interactive "get out the vote" public service message, in the form of a free downloadable Sims object. This Sims object is an electronic voting machine that lets your Sims vote between four candidates: Kerry, Bush, Nader and Badnarik.


The Sims 1 Crowd Sitter

It turns out you can get a whole lot of The Sims 1 characters on the screen at once! But then you need some crowd control and coordination.

Here's an object that I'm developing for The Sims 1 as part of the Simprov wedding playset, and some screen shots of what it does.

This is the new "Crowd Sitter" object for The Sims 1. Donna and I came up with an idea for an icon to represent this magical crowd control object, which will only be visible in build mode. But for now it looks like an altar.

I named it "Crowd Sitter", like "baby sitter" but it's for all ages and lots of people at once, and it can also make them stand. It's an essential tool for orchestrating weddings, but it's useful for other purposes like parties and concerts and boxing matches.

When in play mode, you can turn a Crowd Sitter on and off with a pie menu, and it directs all people to sit down in front of it, or stand up facing it if there aren't any seats left. It has an effective radius of about 7 tiles (more now), with a quarter pie slice shaped footprint. You can strategically deploy as many sitters as you need, to cover all the seats you want people to sit in or areas you want them to stand (like rows of pews in a church or a circle of benches in a stadium). I made a special routing slot that has a maximum size 54 tile footprint (more now), based on the TV set's routing slot, but on steroids.

I stress tested it by making four of these Crowd Sitter objects, and facing them in different directions, to make people gather around the center in a circular crowd.

Then I made at least 8 * 20 = 160 people (Sim clones), and turned on all the sitters at once facing outwards, to make them all gather around the center! But of course if there are no seats to sit in, the poor people have to stand.

In the following scene, I'm cheating by using the faith based initiative "placebo field" (aka Fox News), which is a special effect built into the altar, that supernaturally makes everybody always happy, fills their tummies, drains their bladders, keeps them clean, etc, so they're willing to stand around tirelessly without complaining, for as long as I tell them to, and not questioning anything they're told, while totally believing their government is looking out for them.

Sims Content Catalog in Laszlo and Python

This is a large project I'm developing in OpenLaszlo: creating a rich web application for browsing, searching, exploring, collecting, personalizing, shopping and downloading Sims content.

I'm working with SimFreaks to put their entire catalog of thousands of Sims objects and characters into this database driven catalog. I'm using Transmogrifier to automatically export pictures of all the Sims objects.

Besides simply searching the catalog for interesting objects, you can navigate and explore collections of objects, and even interactivally compose your own scenes.

It's like a cross between colorforms playsets, hypercard and graphical adventures, with Sims room backgrounds, objects and characters, including interlinked image maps and text annotations.

The front-end is implemented in OpenLaszlo, and the back-end is implemented in Python, using SQLObject.

It also includes an administrative database interface for browsing and editing the SQL database that is used to model the site, and keep track of the users, objects, collections, pictures, etc. It's extensible by plugging in customizable Laszlo widgets for displaying and editing special data types, like pictures, checkboxes, color selectors, date pickers, pie menus, OPML editors, etc.

Player Created Content

This is stuff about The Sims player created content.

Automating The Sims Character Animation Pipeline with MaxScript

From: johnw@lyric.com (John Wainwright)
Sent: Tuesday, May 05, 1998 1:31 PM
To: dhopkins@maxis.com (Don Hopkins)
Subject: CGDC talk

Hi, Don.

Kinetix has roped me into giving a talk about MAXScript at the Game Developer's Conference in Long Beach on Friday. I wanted to see if its OK to mention your use of MAXScript at Maxis and if so, maybe you could give a few bullet points on what it's OK for me to mention. Of course, I remember the note track key stuff and the Access database interface, but I'm not sure if there were other things and how all that wound up coming together.

Thanks,
John.

Certainly! Here is a description of how I'm using MaxScript to implement The Sims character animation pipeline:

Sims Proposals and Documentation

Here are some proposals and documents I've written, describing the work I've done and projects I've proposed with The Sims character animation system, plug-in objects and tools. After four years, a great deal of useful information has been reverse-engineered by independent third-party developers and open source projects like The Sims Technical Library. I hope these ideas will inspire more tool developers to contribute their programming skills to the Sims community.

Will Wright's original vision was enabling creative storytelling, by allowing players to add their own characters and objects to the game, and encouraging developers to program new objects and create tools like Transmogrifier and RugOMatic. Before The Sims was even released, Luc Barthelet sewed the seeds of its success by providing fans with content and tools like SimShow, so they could start making web sites and character skins. By the time it was released, you could already download a wide range of skins from many different web sites!

Four years later, Sims Object hackers have taken it much further than anyone ever imagined. A third-party tool called "iffpencil 2" has taken the place of Edith (Maxis's visual Sims object programming environment) in the Sims object hacking community. Make money, play with buildings and people, or create natural disasters! One mind-blowing example is Slice City, which is an amazing game within a game: SimCity within The Sims! Your Sims can walk around and interact with a live, growing city like a Lilliputian scene from Gulliver's Travels. I'm not making this up: this actually runs INSIDE The Sims, and is ingeniously implemented by plug-in objects!

You start with a power plant, which gradually grows a whole city populated by swarms of insect-sized people. As the city grows, it spawns new objects including buildings (reprogrammed houseplants that the gardener still waters), crowds of people (reprogrammed cockroaches that you can still stomp to death), parks, marinas and monuments. You can go into build mode and rearrange them however you like, place roads (that get extremely busy at rush hour), and interact with the buildings through pie menus in play mode. There's even a tornado that comes through and knocks down your buildings. And you can download add-ons and pre-made cities!

Nothing like SliceCity was in the original design plan, but Will Wright credits all the creative players as the primary reason The Sims has become the #1 selling game of all time.

I believe the starkly contrasting failure of The Sims Online has a lot to do with the fact that it doesn't support player created content like the original Sims. One of the fundamental reasons that original Sims players have been disappointed with The Sims Online, is that Maxis never executed on the original plan to let online players upload and exchange their own skins and objects.

In order to help more fully realize Will's original plan, I wrote these proposals and documents to support the community of Sims artists, tool developers and object programmers like Bil Simser, Judson Hudson, Michael Watson, Rick Halle, Tom van Dijk, Dave Baum and Greg Noel, SimSlice, Paladin, MegaSims, Hacker's Resource, The Sims Basement and SimFreaks.

Details on The Sims Character Animation File Format and Rendering

From: "Bil Simser"
To: "Don Hopkins"
Sent: Tuesday, March 21, 2000 7:17 AM
Subject: SKN format

Hi Don,

Is there any way you can just toss me a bone on the SKN files? Just a quick overview? I have most of it but just trying to figure out how the groups are identified. I know it's the 3rd section (after the faces) but not sure what the 4 numbers are for? Can you give me a quick rundown of the file? Thanks.

-Bil

From: "Don Hopkins"
To: "Bil Simser"
Sent: Tuesday, March 21, 2000 12:10 PM
Subject: Re: SKN format

The thing that makes the mesh format weird are the blended vertices, attached to two bones at once. Here are some design documents I wrote, about the Sims file formats, and the animation system. It documents the binary file format, while the cmx files are text, but pretty much equivalent, but maybe missing a few weird fields. It doesn't document the far file format, but I can write that up some time, since it's pretty simple.

-Don

Sims Character Animation File Format

This is a description of the file formats and structures used by The Sims character animation system, by Don Hopkins.

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