Pie Menus

History and Future of OLPC SimCity / Micropolis

There are several different versions of SimCity, and at least two different names (so far):

  • The original version of SimCity was developed by Maxis on the C64, and ported to various platforms, including the Macintosh. Maxis licensed the Macintosh SimCity source code to DUX software, to port to Unix.
  • DUX Software contracted me (Don Hopkins) to port SimCity to Unix, and I developed "SimCity HyperLook Edition", while working at the Turing Institute on HyperLook with Arthur van Hoff. The user interface was written in PostScript, which ran on the NeWS window system on Sun workstations, and it supported multiple zoomable views, pie menus, annotating and printing maps, and many user interface improvements.
  • After Sun canceled NeWS, DUX Software contracted me to rewrite the HyperLook user interface in TCL/Tk for X11, and I developed a multi-player networked user interface using the X11 protocol. The TCL/Tk version of SimCity has been ported to various Unix and non-Unix platforms, including SunOS, Solaris, Irix, HP/UX, OSF/1, Quarterdeck Desqview/X, NDC X Terminals, Warp, and Linux. The contract to sell SimCity for Unix expired after ten years, so the TCL/Tk version was no longer commercially available.
  • OLPC SimCity is based on the TCL/Tk version of SimCity. SimCity is a trademark of Electronic Arts. Don Hopkins adapted SimCity to the OLPC, thanks to the support of John Gilmore. OLPC SimCity will be shipped with the OLPC, and it has been run through EA's quality assurance process and reviewed for integrity. EA reserves the right to review and approve any version of the game distributed under the name SimCity.
  • "Micropolis" is the name of the current GPL open source code version of OLPC SimCity. That was the original working title of Will Wright's city simulation game. Since Micropolis is licensed under the GPL, anyone can do anything they want with it that conforms with the GPL, except they can't call it "SimCity" (and a few other limitations to protect EA's trademarks).
  • Other differently named projects can be forked from the Micropolis source code, as long as they're not called SimCity.
  • Improvements to the open source code base that merits EA's approval may be incorporated into the official "OLPC SimCity" source code, to be distributed with the OLPC under the trademarked name "OLPC SimCity", but only after it's been reviewed and approved by EA.
  • In the short term, the TCL/Tk version of Micropolis can be upgraded to support the latest version of TCL/Tk, fix bugs, improve the user interface and Sugar integration, etc. Once that is stable as well integrated into Sugar, it could be submitted to EA to become the official version of "OLPC SimCity" distributed on the XO laptop.
  • In the long term, Micropolis can be recast from C to C++ classes, so it's possible to define clean interfaces between software modules, and make multiple instances of the simulator that don't interfere with each other, as well as easily interfacing it to Python using the SWIG interface generator. That should be done in a language-neutral way, so you could plug the simulator engine into many different languages and programming systems. Then more work needs to be done to open it up, and make it re-vectorable (plug-ins, events, callbacks, hooks, aspect oriented programming, etc), so you can replace and extend the various modules with the host language(s), eventually re-implementing most if not all of SimCity in another language.

GPL Open Source Code of "OLPC SimCity" to be called "Micropolis"

The GPL source code version of SimCity will not be called "SimCity", but we will use the SimCity source code to make a city building game called "Micropolis", which was the original working title of SimCity. That's because EA reserves the right to review and QA the official version of the game that's published under the name "SimCity" on the OLPC. So we can make improvements to the TCL/Tk version of Micropolis (based on the GPL source code), and submit them to EA for review and QA, which if they approve, will be used as the officially branded version of SimCity for the OLPC. It will be the same code, but the only difference is the name, which EA understandably wants to protect, be ensuring the quality and integrity of OLPC SimCity.

SimCity for OLPC (One Laptop Per Child): Applying Papert's Ideas About Constructionist Education and Teaching Kids to Program

Here are some ideas about applying Seymour Papert's philosophy of "Constructionist Education" to SimCity, by integrating it with the OLPC's "Sugar" user interface and Python-based scripting system.

Back in the early 90's, I ported the classic version of SimCity to Unix, first implementing a PostScript-based user interface for the NeWS window system with the HyperLook gui environment, then a multi-player TCL/Tk based user interface for the X11 window system, for the Sun, SGI, NCD and other X11-based systems.

I've updated the TCL/Tk/X11 version of SimCity to run on the latest version of Linux, and I'm in the process of adapting it for the OLPC. I got permission from Will Wright to show the unreleased development version of OLPC SimCity at the 2007 Game Developer's Conference (GDC). OLPC News wrote an article about SimCity on the OLPC XO, and Gamasutra reported that SJ Klein Asks For Serious OLPC Content at GCD.

SJ said that the OLPC project is looking not just for games, but for tools that enable kids to program their own games. "Existing games are nice, and cute," but games for things like learning language are the "gem they're targeting." Most importantly, Klein said in a direct plea to the serious game developers in front of him, the project needed frameworks and scripting environments -- tools with which children themselves could create their own content.

The TCL/Tk scripting languages and user interface toolkit was a great choice for X11 at the time (around 1992), and it still runs fine because the code is self-contained and X11 hasn't changed in all that time. But it would be wonderful to re-implement SimCity with a modern, powerful scripting language like Python, and create a kid-friendly user interface and scripting API, focused on Constructionist Education, and teaching kids creative writing and programming language skills.

The HyperLook version of SimCity had some cool features like map zooming and editing at any scale, and a user-customizable hypercard-like interface, that weren't easy to implement in TCL/Tk/X11 at the time. But fortunately, the OLPC's Sugar user interface takes advantage of Cairo and Pango for rendering graphics and text, which are better than PostScript!

The first step in integrating SimCity with Sugar is to clean up and modularize the C simulator code, and plug it into Python (which is a much more powerful scripting language than TCL, and the standard language for OLPC programming).

Sugar is based on Python, and uses the GTK toolkit, Cairo rendering library, Pango international text layout library, and Hippo drawing canvas, and many others useful modules. Once SimCity is integrated with Python, it will be great fun to create a kid-friendly multi-player user interface that's totally integrated with the OLPC's unique hardware design (like the hires mono/color LCD screen, which flips over into book mode with a game controller pad) and Sugar's advanced features, like scalable graphics, journaling, mesh networking, messaging, collaboration, and (most importantly) applying Seymour Papert's philosophy of "Constructionist Education" to SimCity.

The goals of deeply integrating SimCity with Sugar are to focus on education and accessibility for younger kids, as well as motivating and enabling older kids to learn programming, in the spirit of Seymour Papert's work with Logo. It should be easy to extend and re-program SimCity in many interesting ways. For example: kids should be able to create new disasters and agents (like the monster, tornado, helicopter and train), and program them like Logo's turtle graphics or Robot Odyssey's visual robot programming language!

The long term goal is to refactor the code so it can be scripted and extended in Python, and break out reusable general purpose components like the tile engine, sprite engine, etc, so kids can use them to build their own games, or create plug-ins and modify the graphics and behavior of SimCity.

The Cairo graphics based user interface will let you zoom into the map like Google Maps, overlay scalable information visualizations, drawings and text. The journaling interface will extend the SimCity save files with a blog-like history of events in the city timeline, enable players to write their own time-stamped and geo-coded stories about events on the map, and let you fast forward, rewind and branch time like a virtual TiVo. The mesh networking interface will let you share cities and play with friends over the network, vote on plans and issues, tell stories and publish journals/newspapers/blogs/maps about your cities.

Other Sugar developers are building visual programming interfaces that can be eventually be used to script the behavior of SimCity plug-ins!

Pie Menus for OLPC Sugar User Interface, in Python with GTK, Cairo and Pango modules.

Pie Menus on Python/GTK/Cairo for OLPC Sugar, by Don Hopkins.

Python Source Code

Tar File with Source, Demos and Icons.

Demos of Pie Menus for OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) Sugar User Interface on XO Laptop

I've been doing some fun OLPC user interface programming in Python. The OLPC's open source software environment includes Linux (for operating), Python (for scripting), GTK (for widgets), Cairo (for structured/stencil/paint/outline graphics) and Pango (for formatted text with markup), and it totally rocks!

Four item pie menu with submenus:

Pop up the "Compass" pie submenu, which has eight pie items and three linear overflow items and select "NE". These menus support pure pie menus, pure linear menus, and hybrid pie/linear menus. They can limit the number of pie items to a convenient number like 8, and make the rest linear items.


Pop up a ridiculously complex "Ringed" pie submenu, which has four rings of items, the inner ring with only four, which are very easy to select, the next ring with eight, which are easy to select because they're further out, the next ring with 24, and the next ring with a bunch more, which are harder but possible to select. This is the ultimate stress test of ringed pie menus. (Well actually there is no limit to the number of rings, but too many rings and menu items may result in heavy, unstable, radioactive pie menus!)


Example SimCity Pie Menus

To demonstrate how icons can work together with help text in the footer, I've made a set of example pie menus for selecting SimCity editing tools (based on the graphics and layout of the old X11/TCL/Tk SimCity interface), in simcity_piemenus.py. Note: They do not actually do anything -- it's just a simulated simulation!

SimCity tool selection menu, with two submenus ("Zone..." and "Build..."), and six important quickly selectable editing tool items. Shows icons without labels, and descriptive help text in the footers.

SimCity Zone pie submenu. Six items for zoning residential, commercial and industrial, fire stations, police stations, and querying zones.

SimCity Build pie submenu. Six items for building parks, stadiums, seaports, coal power plants, nuclear power plants, and airports.

Open Source SimFaux OpenLaszlo Code Now Available via Subversion

I've published the source code and content of SimFaux as Open Source Software. It's available via read-only anonymous subversion. Here's the command to get all the source code and content:

svn co svn://SimFaux.com/SimFaux/trunk/SimFaux

I've started writing a README.txt file, but that's about all the documentation there is so far.

SimFaux 1.0 README

SimFaux is an interactive TV station simulator written in OpenLaszlo,
by Don Hopkins, for the HuffingtonPost Contagious Festival.

It's an open-ended framework for plugging together keyword tagged
multimedia character simulations, video, text, quotes, surveys,
interactive games and application.

It's configured with XML files, so non-programmers can easily add
characters, video and other types of content.

It includes tools for validating, processing and compressing the
content into appropriate file formats.

========================================================================
Installation:

Posted a new version of SimFaux

I've just posted a new version of SimFaux, which has a bunch more features, and many more quotes (tagged with keywords), to go with the new characters. Now there are 136 Frank Zappa quotes!

In Washington, they just look out for #1, and #1 ain't you. You ain't even #2.
-Frank Zappa

-Don

SimFaux now has WebCam Support and Simulated Internet Chat Room

I've just uploaded a new version of the SimFaux Interactive Network News Simulation to the Huffington Post's Contagious Festival!

This version has WebCam support: you can display your webcam in one or more frames, FauxCast yourself on any Faux News TV channel, and interview the simulated characters in person! Don't let Bill O'Reilly tell you to shut up and kick you off!

It also has a new simulated internet "Faux Chat" room, which you'll have to try out because explaining how it works would spoil the surprize!

SimFaux Interactive Network News Simulation

I've just uploaded the first version of the SimFaux Interactive Network News Simulation to the Huffington Post's Contagious Festival!

It's pronounced "Sim Foe". Like the Colbert report: it's french, bitch!

It has an cinematic interactive interface consisting of several different screen layouts, each with a different number of frames, which you can configure to display a variety of simulated characters, streaming videos, interactive surveys, and text talking points. Here's the conference screen layout showing several videos, a couple of characters, a survey and talking points:

SimFaux Conference Screen (an OpenLaszlo application, by Don Hopkins)

Designing to Facilitate Browsing: A Look Back at the Hyperties Workstation Browser

Designing to Facilitate Browsing: A Look Back at the Hyperties Workstation Browser

By Ben Shneiderman, Catherine Plaisant, Rodrigo Botafogo, Don Hopkins, William Weiland.

Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory
A.V. Williams Bldg., University of Maryland
College Park MD 20742, U.S.A.

Abstract

Since browsing hypertext can present a formidable cognitive challenge, user interface design plays a major role in determining acceptability. In the Unix workstation version of Hyperties, a research-oriented prototype, we focussed on design features that facilitate browsing. We first give a general overview of Hyperties and its markup language. Customizable documents can be generated by the conditional text feature that enables dynamic and selective display of text and graphics. In addition we present:

  • an innovative solution to link identification: pop-out graphical buttons of arbitrary shape.
  • application of pie menus to permit low cognitive load actions that reduce the distraction of common actions, such as page turning or window selection.
  • multiple window selection strategies that reduce clutter and housekeeping effort. We preferred piles-of-tiles, in which standard-sized windows were arranged in a consistent pattern on the display and actions could be done rapidly, allowing users to concentrate on the contents.

HyperTIES Hypermedia Browser and Emacs Authoring Tool for NeWS

HyperTIES is an early hypermedia browser developed under the direction of Dr. Ben Shneiderman at the University of Maryland Human Computer Interaction Lab.


HyperTIES Browser (right) and UniPress Emacs Multi Window Text Editor Authoring Tool (left), tab windows and pie menus, running under the NeWS Window System.


HyperTIES Browser NeWS Client/Server Software Architecture.

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