Politics

Posted a new version of SimFaux

I've just posted a new version of SimFaux, which has a bunch more features, and many more quotes (tagged with keywords), to go with the new characters. Now there are 136 Frank Zappa quotes!

In Washington, they just look out for #1, and #1 ain't you. You ain't even #2.
-Frank Zappa

-Don

FauxCast on Freedom: SimFaux as Open Source Software

Somebody asked me about SimFaux:

This is pretty funny as it stands, but can it parody things Libs don't like to talk about like Dem politicos that flipflop every other speech, or Lib talking heads that forge news on the fly?

Of course SimFaux can parody liberals as well as conservatives, but the fact of the matter is that it's the conservatives who are fucking up the country right now and sending kids to die. The liberals are powerless and aren't the ones to blame for the horrible calamity that Bush has caused. So it's important to call the people who are causing the death and suffering on their lies.

The conservatives had their chance with Clinton's blow job, and they totally blew it with their self rightious indignation over harmless consentual sex. Talk about flip-flops: Where is the furious anger and relentless calls for impeachment now?

It's high time to impeach Bush for going to war based on lies and deception, sending thousands of Americans to their death, killing hundreds of thousands of Iraqis, leaking classified information about a CIA employee out of revenge for her husband telling the truth, breaking the law and subverting the constitution by spying on American citizens, his miserable failure with Hurricaine Katrina, his deep shameless corruption with Haliburton and Abramoff, etc. If you think none of that is any worse than a blow job, then you're a part of the problem.

I just started programming SimFaux at the beginning of this month, and the HuffingtonPost Contagious Festival has a 15 meg limit on size. But after the festival concludes, I'll host it on my own web site without any size limitations, put up a whole lot more content like characters, sound bites and videos, and release the source code as Open Source Software so you can modify it and put your own stuff in. But right now I have to cut it to the bone to stay within the 15 meg limit.

"FauxCasting" is a cinematic leap beyond podcasting and blogging, because it integrates keyword tagged text, video, sound bites, simulated characters and interactive widgets together in a way that the viewer has control over what they see and hear. You can experienced the joy of telling Bill O'Reilly to Shut Up and Go Away! The keyword tagging enables the characters and videos to interact with each other, and results in surprizing juxtapositionings, like Frank Zappa and Dick Cheney finding common ground by using the same cuss word that begins with F.

I'm inspired by ideas like Will Wright's "Designing for Emergent Behavior" and Chris Trottier's "Tuned Emergence" and "Design by Accretion", where the more content you put in, and the better you tune it, the closer you get to a nuclear reaction.

Sims Designer Chris Trottier on Tuned Emergence and Design by Accretion

"If a game isn't tuned, it's a drag, and you can't stand to play it for an hour. The Sims and SimCity were "designed by accretion": incrementally assembled together out of "a mass of separate components", like a planet forming out of a cloud of dust orbiting around star. They had to reach critical mass first, before they could even start down the road towards "Tuned Emergence", like life finally taking hold on the planet surface. Even then, they weren't fun until they were carefully tuned just before they shipped, like the renaissance of civilization suddenly developing science and technology. Before it was properly tuned, The Sims was called "the toilet game", for the obvious reason that there wasn't much else to do!"

I will soon release the source code and content of SimFaux as Open Source Software, so you can see how it works, create your own characters, sound bites, video clips, talking points, surveys, games, etc. If you want to do that yourself, you should become familiar with XML, and you should start learning OpenLaszlo, which is the free Open Source XML/JavaScript based language it's written in.

http://www.OpenLaszlo.org

Here's another more down-to-earth example of what you can do with OpenLaszlo:

http://www.LaszloMail.com

Have fun!

SimFaux now has WebCam Support and Simulated Internet Chat Room

I've just uploaded a new version of the SimFaux Interactive Network News Simulation to the Huffington Post's Contagious Festival!

This version has WebCam support: you can display your webcam in one or more frames, FauxCast yourself on any Faux News TV channel, and interview the simulated characters in person! Don't let Bill O'Reilly tell you to shut up and kick you off!

It also has a new simulated internet "Faux Chat" room, which you'll have to try out because explaining how it works would spoil the surprize!

SimFaux Interactive Network News Simulation

I've just uploaded the first version of the SimFaux Interactive Network News Simulation to the Huffington Post's Contagious Festival!

It's pronounced "Sim Foe". Like the Colbert report: it's french, bitch!

It has an cinematic interactive interface consisting of several different screen layouts, each with a different number of frames, which you can configure to display a variety of simulated characters, streaming videos, interactive surveys, and text talking points. Here's the conference screen layout showing several videos, a couple of characters, a survey and talking points:

SimFaux Conference Screen (an OpenLaszlo application, by Don Hopkins)

Patrick J. Fitzgerald for SCOTUS

This could probably be said about most anyone, but Patrick J. Fitzgerald is much better qualified for the Supreme Court than Harriet E. Miers.

RMS Essay: Come Celebrate the Joy of Programming, with the World's Most Unbureaucratic Computers.

This is an essay written a while ago (1986 or so) by Richard M Stallman (RMS), about his experiences at the MIT AI Lab, and the story of the Lisp Machine Wars.

Machine Room Folk Dance, Thursday at 8pm.
Come Celebrate the Joy of Programming,
with the World's Most Unbureaucratic Computers.
(There were only five of us dancing, but we had a good time.)

My first experience with computers was with manuals for various languages that I borrowed from counselors at camp. I would write programs on paper just because of the fascination of the concept of programming. I had to strain to think of what the programs should do, because I had nothing to supply me with a goal except that I wanted to program. I wrote programs to add up the cubes of a table of numbers in several assembler languages at various times.

The first actual computers I met were IBM 360's, at the IBM New York Scientific Center, when I was a student in high school. There I quickly developed interest in language design, operating systems and text editors. Hired for the summer to write a boring numerical analysis program in Fortran, I surprised my boss by finishing it after a couple of weeks and spent the rest of the summer writing a text editor in APL.

I also quickly manifested a lack of proper reverence for authority. The whole center had been denied access to the IBM computer in the building, and we had to use slow telephone connections to the Cambridge Scientific Center. One day an IBM executive came to tell us about the work various IBM scientific centers were doing, and finished with, "Of course you all know the important work being done here." I asked him, "If our work is so important, why can't we use the computer in this building any more?" After the meeting, my friends told me they had wanted to say such a thing but were afraid of reprisals! Why? Certainly nothing happened to me as a result. They seem to have learned the habit of cowering before authority even when not actually threatened. How very nice for authority. I decided not to learn this particular lesson.

The October Surprise: The Iranian Hostage Rescue Mission, and the 1980 Presidential Election

The October Surprise:
The Iranian Hostage Rescue Mission, and the 1980 Presidential Election

By Don Hopkins, December 1988.

I. Iran under the Shah

The Shah of Iran, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, came to power in 1953, thanks to a CIA-supported coup. The Shah's friendship and cooperation was extremely important for American foreign policy -- it gave the U.S. much influence in the region.

Iran is in extremely strategic position, adjacent to the Soviet Union and Persian Gulf countries. It also has enormous amounts of oil and money.

In accordance with the Nixon Doctrine, the United States sold weapons to the Shah, who used them to maintain the stability of his regime, and protect US interests. Arms were an extremely important part of Iranian-American relationship.

Dumbold Voting Machine for The Sims

The Dumbold Voting Machine for The Sims enables the simulated people in your virtual dollhouse to vote! It's an interactive "get out the vote" public service message, in the form of a free downloadable Sims object. This Sims object is an electronic voting machine that lets your Sims vote between four candidates: Kerry, Bush, Nader and Badnarik.


The Sims 1 Crowd Sitter

It turns out you can get a whole lot of The Sims 1 characters on the screen at once! But then you need some crowd control and coordination.

Here's an object that I'm developing for The Sims 1 as part of the Simprov wedding playset, and some screen shots of what it does.

This is the new "Crowd Sitter" object for The Sims 1. Donna and I came up with an idea for an icon to represent this magical crowd control object, which will only be visible in build mode. But for now it looks like an altar.

I named it "Crowd Sitter", like "baby sitter" but it's for all ages and lots of people at once, and it can also make them stand. It's an essential tool for orchestrating weddings, but it's useful for other purposes like parties and concerts and boxing matches.

When in play mode, you can turn a Crowd Sitter on and off with a pie menu, and it directs all people to sit down in front of it, or stand up facing it if there aren't any seats left. It has an effective radius of about 7 tiles (more now), with a quarter pie slice shaped footprint. You can strategically deploy as many sitters as you need, to cover all the seats you want people to sit in or areas you want them to stand (like rows of pews in a church or a circle of benches in a stadium). I made a special routing slot that has a maximum size 54 tile footprint (more now), based on the TV set's routing slot, but on steroids.

I stress tested it by making four of these Crowd Sitter objects, and facing them in different directions, to make people gather around the center in a circular crowd.

Then I made at least 8 * 20 = 160 people (Sim clones), and turned on all the sitters at once facing outwards, to make them all gather around the center! But of course if there are no seats to sit in, the poor people have to stand.

In the following scene, I'm cheating by using the faith based initiative "placebo field" (aka Fox News), which is a special effect built into the altar, that supernaturally makes everybody always happy, fills their tummies, drains their bladders, keeps them clean, etc, so they're willing to stand around tirelessly without complaining, for as long as I tell them to, and not questioning anything they're told, while totally believing their government is looking out for them.

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