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SimCity | Don Hopkins

SimCity

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Slashdot OLPC SimCity Discussion

From: Don Hopkins
To: Alan Kay
Subject: Slashdot OLPC SimCity Discussion

I'm with you completely! Here are a couple messages I posted in the Slashdot discussion "One SimCity Per Child":
http://games.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/11/08/200234

Here's a great article, too!
http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20071110-original-sim-city-donated-to-one-laptop-per-child-project.html

-Don

Responding to Alan Kay's criticisms of SimCity

In other (and fewer) words, the plan is to respond to Alan Kay's valid criticisms of SimCity by opening it up to scripting languages, documenting and parameterizing how it works, and ultimately implementing an eToys-like visual programming language for scripting and extending SimCity, and implementing your own games based on the reusable components that SimCity will be rebuilt in terms of (like a generic tile engine, sprite engine, map editing tools, numerical and symbolic layers, data visualizations, overlays, annotations, points of interest, etc).

Oops, I was trying for fewer words. Oh well...

-Don

Alan Kay's ideas about SimCity for OLPC

I just received this exciting email from Alan Kay. I totally agree with the direction he wants to take SimCity for the OLPC!

-Don

From: Alan Kay
To: Don Hopkins
Date: 11/9/2007 6:14 PM
Subject: SimCity for OLPC

Hi Don --

I'm writing to applaud you for your plans to reimplement SimCity for children on the OLPC.

My main complaint about this game has always been the rigidity, and sometimes stupidity, of its assumptions (counter crime with more police stations) and the opaqueness of its mechanism (children can't find out what its actual assumptions are, see what they look like, or change them to try other systems dynamics).

So I have used SimCity as an example of an anti-ed environment despite all the awards it has won. It's kind of an air-guitar environment.

In the past, I tried to get Maxis to take the actual (great) educational possibilities more seriously, but to no avail.

Going to Python can help a few areas of this, but a better abstraction for the heart of Sim-City would be a way to show its rules/heuristics in a readable and writable form. Both of these could be stylized to put them in the child's own thinking and doing world. For example, just the simple route of making a drag and drop scripting interface for Etoys allows children to make very readable and writeable scripts and helps the children concentrate on what they are trying to do. A carefully designed object system (that is filtered fro children) can expose the environment so they can really think about it.

I'm not at all suggesting that Etoys be used here, but I am suggesting that some deep design be done to come up with a "behavior modification interface" that allows real creativity on the part of the children. So it is much more than stringing black boxes together or having to deal with fragile procedurals.

I sense that you have some interests in making SimCity really a microworld for children's learning and exploration from reading your webpage.

Children in 4th - 6th grade can do a lot here if they are given a good UI and tools. So, we could think of part of this project as a "pre-Python" UI.

Scalability and non-scalability of ideas are interesting. Rocky's Boots is still one of the best ever games that provide profound learning experiences. The extension of this to Robot Odyssey didn't work because the logic and wires programming didn't scale well enough -- the bang per effort dropped off precipitously. I was Chief Scientist at Atari at that time (Warren Robbinet worked for me) and I worked with TLC to try to get them to realize that something like Logo, or even better, a rule-based robot programming system, was needed. The failure of Robot Odyssey really pained me because I thought that the concept of this game was one of the best ever (still is). But it just needed a much better notion of how the children were going to program the robots. I think the same goes for SimCity.

Cheers,

Alan

SJ Klein's OLPC Keynote at GDC Serious Games Summit

Here is a description of the OLPC talk that SJ Klein is giving at the Serious Games summit on Tuesday the 6th:

https://www.cmpevents.com/GD07/a.asp?option=G&V=3&id=520162

Alan Kay on Programming Languages

Alan Kay wrote:

It's hard to point to any programming language for beginners that has a really great form. One thing that has consistently worked is "close to natural language but clearly not natural language". That is, it really helps if the gist-view of a program is a kind of metaphor for what it does, even if one has to think harder about the detailed meaning. For children, Hypercard was OK in many respects for the gist-view, but was too like English for both deep understanding and for programming (many children had a hard time getting past the idea that Hypercard couldn't understand and do any reasonable English sentence). This was debated endlessly in Logo circles, and Logo wound up going from a much more English-like syntax to one much more like Lisp (this was a big mistake in my view). Finding the balance between these is critical, because it governs how much brain is left to the learner to think about content rather than form. And for most learners, it is the initial experiences that make the difference for whether they want to dive in or try to avoid future encounters.

Pie Menus for OLPC Sugar User Interface, in Python with GTK, Cairo and Pango modules.

Pie Menus on Python/GTK/Cairo for OLPC Sugar, by Don Hopkins.

Python Source Code

Tar File with Source, Demos and Icons.

Demos of Pie Menus for OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) Sugar User Interface on XO Laptop

I've been doing some fun OLPC user interface programming in Python. The OLPC's open source software environment includes Linux (for operating), Python (for scripting), GTK (for widgets), Cairo (for structured/stencil/paint/outline graphics) and Pango (for formatted text with markup), and it totally rocks!

Four item pie menu with submenus:

Pop up the "Compass" pie submenu, which has eight pie items and three linear overflow items and select "NE". These menus support pure pie menus, pure linear menus, and hybrid pie/linear menus. They can limit the number of pie items to a convenient number like 8, and make the rest linear items.


Pop up a ridiculously complex "Ringed" pie submenu, which has four rings of items, the inner ring with only four, which are very easy to select, the next ring with eight, which are easy to select because they're further out, the next ring with 24, and the next ring with a bunch more, which are harder but possible to select. This is the ultimate stress test of ringed pie menus. (Well actually there is no limit to the number of rings, but too many rings and menu items may result in heavy, unstable, radioactive pie menus!)


Example SimCity Pie Menus

To demonstrate how icons can work together with help text in the footer, I've made a set of example pie menus for selecting SimCity editing tools (based on the graphics and layout of the old X11/TCL/Tk SimCity interface), in simcity_piemenus.py. Note: They do not actually do anything -- it's just a simulated simulation!

SimCity tool selection menu, with two submenus ("Zone..." and "Build..."), and six important quickly selectable editing tool items. Shows icons without labels, and descriptive help text in the footers.

SimCity Zone pie submenu. Six items for zoning residential, commercial and industrial, fire stations, police stations, and querying zones.

SimCity Build pie submenu. Six items for building parks, stadiums, seaports, coal power plants, nuclear power plants, and airports.

Educational Multi Player SimCity for Linux Proposal

Back in March 2002, Maxis told me they were interested in supporting the educational use of products like SimCity. Earlier, I had developed a multi player version of SimCity, which runs on Linux/X11, and was scriptable in TCL. Educators and researchers from Columbia University, MIT, IBM, Xerox and other educational and commercial institutions were excited about gaining access to this version of SimCity, and adapting it to teach and stimulate students' interest in urban planning, computer simulation and game programming.

So I wrote this proposal and presented it to Maxis, but nothing ever became of it. But recently, Will Wright has been pushing EA to relicense SimCity under the GPL, so the OLPC project can use it. So it may eventually see the light of day!

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